Citește site-ul în română

Caraorman

Caraorman is one of the many gems you will find in the Danube Delta. It is an old fishermen’s village located on the sandbank between the Sulina and Sfantu Gheorghe channels.

The name is of Turkish origins and it means “Black forest”, due to the vast oak forest nearby. A good portion of it is made of four centuries old trees that leave a dark, unsettling shadow.

Its genesis is similar to the Letea forest, for which both have been declared monuments of nature in 1940 and included into strictly protected areas.

The population of almost five hundred people is made up mostly of Ukrainians who support themselves through fishing, with tourism becoming more and more part of everyday life.

It is one of the places in the Danube Delta where people have preserved most of their traditions, cultural heritage and way of living.

Caraorman Oak Forest

Caraorman Oak Forest

Just passing by, you will notice that religion has an important part in everyone’s life and that people here don’t wear traditional costumes only for special festive days.

Young or old, Sunday morning is always spent at the church.

You’ll be surprised to find out that in medieval times, the Caraorman area was the place where criminals from all over Dobruja were exiled.

As you’re coming to Caraorman…

Caraorman lies at the end of a canal coming down from Crisan. Your first sight of the village is made of the huge communist ruins where once they wanted to exploit the vast sand dunes in the area.

A few years ago, there were two tall industrial cranes from where you could scout the horizon and get a glimpse of Sulina or even Sfantu Gheorghe. The two were, somehow, the symbol of Caraorman, but were eventually taken down in 2002.

On the left, you can see the Caraorman fishery, where they collect fish from all nearby lakes (Lumina, Puiu, Puiulet, Rotund, Iacob). If you get in, you will be awed by the mammoth carps and other local species. Here, the fish is refrigerated and then shipped to Mahmudia or Tulcea and from there, to fish markets all over the country.

Once in the village, you will notice that every house was built using traditional techniques and materials. Everybody here uses reed  as roofing for his house and not only.

They often use is to build fences and other outdoor structures, giving the whole place a unique charm.

The small Caraorman beach

The village is rapidly turning into a major touristic spot. In any given sunny summer day, when you want to cool off, you can go to what they call the “Fazenda beach”.

It is right at the end of the Caraorman channel, next to the port.

The sand is perfect and the lack of currents makes the water crystal clear and totally safe even for inexperienced swimmers. For a little sport, you can play a game of football or beach volley, right there.

A great place for fishermen

If you want to feel the thrill of catching big game, this place will give you more than you can handle!

This is what you call “a fisherman’s paradise”!

There is a wealth of fantastic fishing sport just minutes away from Caraorman.

Hell, if you’re lazy today, you can just pull your fishing rod out and cast the hook out the window. Most likely, you’ll hit water !

The Crisan-Caraorman channel is deeper and wider than most, so you’ll be able to catch carp, sheatfish, zander, pike, rapacious carp, crucian, perch and many others.

You can also try your luck on the Litcov, Vatafu and Puiulet-Lumina channels. Suez is mostly clogged these days, but there are plenty of other places where you can catch carp.

And there are a bunch of other lakes such as Puiulet, Lumina and Puiu where you can enjoy a whole day in your boat, relaxing and feeling the thrill of the chase.

So if you were in doubt as to where you can go in Danube Delta, put Caraorman of your list. It’s definitely worth it.

What’s next?

Put Caraorman of that list, of course! Then let other people know about this page.

If you’ve enjoyed it, your friends on Facebook and Twitter will definitely love it.

Spread the joy with the world!

Caraorman Oak Forest392

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: